A Mother Cheetahs Guide to Parenting

Parenting. A thought that is often lead by a chuckle and shake of the head.

To those who know it, it’s the strongest bond there is. A bond based on memories of laughter and tears, awards and sacrifices.

There’s no wound a mothers hug can’t heal, no insecurity stronger than a fathers pride.

I was reminded of this recently. Not in the streets or at home, but in the Namibian wild.

We took advantage of a cool Spring morning, and the guests of Mushara eagerly jumped into the safari cruiser.

We drove through along the roads of the Etosha National Park, every turn revealing a new beautiful landscape.

The wildlife was taking in the morning air. Zebras played in the tall grass. Blue Cranes flocked to where one had discovered hidden bugs.

Though filled with life, the day was peaceful. Almost quiet.

That’s the way the kings of the wild like it; you may not hear them, but if you look in the right places, you just may see them.

We didn’t, however, see such a king.

Instead, as we rounded a corner close to the edges of the Twee Palms watering hole, we came across a queen, teaching her princes and princesses how to hunt.

We gazed at the mother Cheetah, surrounded by balls of fur recognisable as her cubs.

She was trying to show them how to sneak through the bushes. The cubs were each trying their best to act the most vicious for mom.

A sight that had everyone taking photos and laughing as the young cubs jumped around playing with each other, and giving their mother the original puppy eyes when she nagged them to follow suit.

It’s a sight such as this that is completely priceless. It shows how universal the connection between family is.

How the guidance of a parent can be the foundation for future growth, even in the heart of the African wild.

Travel Facts –

1) “Twee Palms” is an Afrikaans name meaning “Two Palms”. This is due to the two beautiful Fan Palms growing on the edge of the water.

2) Cheetahs and all big cats usually teach their young cubs how to hunt, and sometimes sacrifice a meal for their young ones so that in the future the young cubs can be dependent on themselves.